Garden Gift Giving

As Christmas sneaks it’s way up on us, don’t forget. We have a charming little brick and mortar store overflowing with gifts for garden and nature lovers. Here’s a peak:

Crabapple and Quince. Yummy preserves hand made from Orcas Island.

Crabapple and Quince. Yummy preserves hand made from Orcas Island.

Early bird tickets to The Northwest Flower and Garden Show. The gift of anticipation.

Early bird tickets to The Northwest Flower and Garden Show. The gift of anticipation.

Imported from England, these Hoe Hoe Hoe Gardener's Christmas stockings will be cherished year-to-year.

Imported from England, these Hoe Hoe Hoe Gardener’s Christmas stockings will be cherished year-to-year.

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The 2018 Vintage Market. It’s on!

The Vintage Market at The Tacoma Home and Garden Show is back and better than ever.

New for 2018: We have the most adorable vintage trailer, plus DIY classes for the vintage/upcycler/crafter, and a show packed full of beautiful vendors specializing in antiques, vintage, and repurposed for the home and garden. You don’t want to miss this one.

The Tacoma Home and Garden Show

The Vintage Market at the Tacoma Home and Garden Show

Tacoma Home and Garden Show 2018

The 2018 Vintage Market at the Tacoma Home and Garden Show

Birds of a feather flock together. Mark your calendar to join us January 25-28, 2018.

#TheVintageMarket  #TacomaVintageMarket #TacomaDome

The Pot of Ill Repute

Garden designers: especially those of us that install many container garden plantings throughout the seasons; are you often left with a few extra annuals after installs? The “oopsies” that you had to have but don’t really fit? Or, the “better get a few extras just-in-case?” 

Don’t you end up using these extra plants in your own container gardens (once you finally get around to planting your own towards the end of June)?

This is a story of my last pot: the pot of ill repute. 

It starts on a rainy cold day sourounded by several weathered cardboard flats full of outcasts and a few things I bought for myself. Plants were going together really well for most of my pots. I’ve been digging bright orange for the last few years and slowly I’ve been replacing yellow with dark purple. I love it! 

Now I’ve come down to the last pot. Ugg, just plant it and be done. The pot holds one random perennial salvia which won’t start to bloom till August, but whatever. Add a couple Petunia ‘Night Sky’ (awesome), and a Dahlia Starsister ‘Orange Stripes’ (How did I miss the tag showing the white stripe? Drag). Then some unknown Coleus and “Voilà.”  I still have a ton of room left… Ok, in goes an Ipomoea batatas ‘Blackie’ because black potato vine is always a good addition. And then, two rouge Diascia barberae ‘Darla Red’ (OMG, they are soooo bright hot pink against the bold orange, royal purple, AND the white. Gasp).  But wait, there’s still more room and only one garish Heuchera x ‘Georgia Peach’ (What are you thinking?), but I did it. Then I had to wait (because annuals have to grow in for a few weeks to look good, I wish they came with that as a warning on the label). 

Only one word can describe the final result: bad ass. 

Steal the look.

Bright garden colors that work.

Petunia and Diacia

Petunia ‘Night Sky’ steals the show.

Coleaus, petunia, diascia, dahlia, potato vine, huechera.

Steal this look for your garden.

Industrial Salvage Garden Magic 

Recycled Garden

Low Maintenance Garden Furniture

Gotta love using Salvage pieces in the garden. This industrial freezer rack makes the best outdoor coffee table for your patio garden. It can survive any weather with zero care.

Or, hang it on a fence for a pea trellis.

How would you upcycle this piece in your home or backyard?

Photo credit: Mike Scerra

Find it at The Urban Gardener in Tacoma, WA.

Hay Bale Veggie Garden, Here’s How I Did It.

Reposting our original post on How To Grow Vegetables in Hay Bales.

The Urban Gardener

Three years ago, I started to hear about this “hay bale gardening.”  I’d seen it done many times, but never really stopped to explore the idea, until I got a rush of regular gardening clients that were looking for advice on how to start their own hay bale gardens.

So, I did what any garden consultant does… I started my own.  I am officially hooked!

I started with 5 bales of alfalfa hay.  Choose carefully where you want to place your bales, because once you start watering, there is no moving that wet heavy bale.  Position the bales so that the tied/twined side of the bale is the outer wall.  You need that twine to contain the walls.  I also had a few rods of rebar leftover from another projects, so I drove the rebar into the ground to hold the bales in-place should they ever shift.

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Next step: sprinkle 1-cup of ammonium…

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